appetizers & recipes: honey cornbread

Corn Bread Recipe

There was a time when I could give my children a wholesome snack in the afternoon. Gone are the days when they will be satisfied with apples dipped in peanut butter, homemade granola bars or honey cornbread and milk. My two sweet boys have grown into teenage eating machines. They don’t eat snacks anymore. They eat entire meals in between their meals. I can’t really blame them. They don’t have an ounce of fat on their frame. They are tall and athletic so I guess if I could eat like they do, I probably would.

I miss the snacks of childhood. Sometimes I grab an apple and the peanut butter and have myself a snack. Once in a while I make honey cornbread because it tastes so good with a nice cold glass of milk. Of course, cornbread isn’t just a snack. It is a delicious to many meals. And what makes cornbread even more appealing is that it can be sweet or it can be spicy. You can flavor it in many tasty ways.

Here is a little trivial information about the etymology of the word “corn”. Corn is an inherently American food. The word “corn” comes from old English “kurnam” “small seed”. The general meaning of the old English word was “grain with the seed still in” (e.g. barleycorn) rather than a particular plant.

According to etymology sources corn was “locally understood to denote the leading crop of a district. Restricted to corn on the cob in America (c.1600, originally Indian corn, but the adjective was dropped), usually wheat in England, oats in Scotland and Ireland, while korn means “rye” in parts of Germany.” Maize was the Taino word for this plant in the West Indies. The word “maize” is the source of the Spanish, Italian and French word for corn.

If you have only used box mixes for corn bread or muffins you probably experience a dry cornbread. Put the boxes back on the shelf and make your own corn bread. It is quick, easy and won’t crumble if you look at it the wrong way. Both the following recipes are moist and delicious. One is sweet and one is spicy.

Honey Corn Bread Recipe

Honey Cornbread

Ingredients

2/3 cup sugar
¼ cup butter, softened
4 eggs
½ cup orange blossom honey
1 1/3 cups milk
2 1/3 cups flour
1 ½ Tablespoon baking powder
½ cup corn meal
1 tsp salt

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
2. Mix sugar and butter until fluffy.
3. Add in eggs, honey and milk and mix well.
4. In a separate bowl gently whisk the flour, baking powder, corn meal and salt.
5. Slowly pour the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients while continuously mixing.
6. Pour batter in greased 11×14-inch baking pan. Bake for 35 minutes or until golden brown.

Jalapeno Cheddar Cornbread (Ina Garten)

Ingredients

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1/4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons baking powder
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 cups milk
3 extra-large eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, melted, plus extra to grease the pan
8 ounces aged extra-sharp Cheddar, grated, divided
1/3 cup chopped scallions, white and green parts, plus extra for garnish, 3 scallions
3 tablespoons seeded and minced fresh jalapeño peppers

Directions

1. Combine the flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, combine the milk, eggs, and butter. With a wooden spoon, stir the wet ingredients into the dry until most of the lumps are dissolved. Don’t over mix! Mix in 2 cups of the grated Cheddar, the scallions and jalapenos, and allow the mixture to sit at room temperature for 20 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a 9 by 13 by 2-inch baking pan.

3. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, smooth the top, and sprinkle with the remaining grated Cheddar and extra chopped scallions. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool and cut into large squares. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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12 comments

  • January 14, 2012 at 2:15 pm //

    What a great presentation! Love it!

    • January 14, 2012 at 2:51 pm //

      Thank you Baltic Maid.

  • January 14, 2012 at 3:14 pm //

    I adore cornbread! Sounds perfect adding some citrus love to the delicious bread:-) Yum! Take care, Terra

    • January 15, 2012 at 4:47 pm //

      Thank you Lottie!

  • January 14, 2012 at 11:56 pm //

    I really like cornbread and have only made savoury ones – love the idea of this one – looks delicious.

    • January 15, 2012 at 8:21 am //

      Thank you so much Jules!

  • January 15, 2012 at 6:47 am //

    How interesting – I’ve only ever had savory cornbread, but the honey sounds like I might enjoy it much more. Great idea!

    • January 15, 2012 at 5:19 pm //

      Thank you so much Kiri! Hope you are having a fab weekend.

  • January 16, 2012 at 6:08 am //

    That looks fantastic! Yummy yummy!

  • January 16, 2012 at 2:59 pm //

    Oh that top picture is making me drool. Look at that sexy looking honey- seducing the corn bread like that… LOL YUM!

  • August 29, 2012 at 8:06 am //

    Donna Washburn and Heather Butt have a real winner on their hands here. They have taken the spaileiczed cooking and baking required for a gluten-free diet and re-thought it from starter to dessert. For those people suffering with celiac disease this book can give them back their appetites for the foods they lovingly remember. Many of the recipes are very innovative and everyone I’ve tried works well and is delicious. 125 doesn’t begin to account for the variations given for each recipe what a great way to make a new favourite into three new favourites. The equipment and techniques glossaries as well as the helpful hints on each recipe make this a valuable resource book for anyone stuggling with gluten-free cooking. What a treat to salivate over the delicious pictures of pizza, battered fish and cakes. Each of the bread recipes includes detailed instructions for making with a bread machine or with a mixer, so everyone can accomplish fabulous results. This book is loaded with information about the gluten-free diet and it’s ingredients and will appeal to the cook and non-cook alike. My Gluten-Free cookbook library wouldn’t be complete without it!