tastily touring: visiting bermuda a kedgeree recipe (fish)

tastily touring: visiting bermuda a kedgeree recipe (fish)

Bermuda is an archipelago (a large group or chain of islands) consisting of seven main islands and about 130 smaller islands. A British overseas territory in the North Atlantic Ocean, the Islands of the Bermuda are located approximately 1000 miles northeast of Miami Florida.

The uninhabited island was discovered around the year 1505, some 500 years ago, by Spanish explorer, Juan de Bermudez, after whom the islands are named. While the discovery was made there was no attempt to land or settle the islands until 1609.

In 1609 nine ships owned by the Virginia Company of London leave England with more colonists and supplies for the settlement of Jamestown, Virginia. The fleet is commanded by Sir George Somers whose ship is separated from the fleet during a storm at sea. The ship becomes lodged on one of Bermuda’s reefs. The crew and colonists are able to make it to shore.

Somers and his crew build 2 new ships. He leaves men on the island to claim it for the British and sets out for Virginia. Upon his arrival he discovers a Jamestown on the verge of collapse. The supplies brought from Bermuda ultimately save the colonists in Jamestown. Somers never makes it back to Bermuda as he falls ill and dies, however the islands are referred to for some time as the Somers Islands.

Around 1612 The Virginia Company sends new settlers to Bermuda and claims the island. They begin construction on the, then capital, of St. George, but eventually the Virginia Company sells the island to the Bermuda Company. By 1684 the British government takes control of the islands from the Bermuda Company and the islands become a British colony. Today, the islands are still a British Overseas Territory but with a great deal of autonomy.

The economy of Bermuda relies heavily upon tourism and is also a very successful offshore financial center. Because the islands are of volcanic origin, surrounding them by many underwater coral reefs many ships have wrecked off the islands, making diving not only a recreational sport, but for some a career.

One of the most fascinating mysteries in history is that of the Bermuda triangle, which falls between Bermuda, Puerto Rico and Florida. It has long been believed that the Bermuda Triangle is the site where a number of mysterious plane and boat incidents have occurred. However, the Bermuda Triangle is a part of a heavily used shipping lane. It is suggested by some scholars that incidents were once exaggerated and that perhaps nothing more than bad weather and human error, similar to those in other parts of the ocean, are the culprit. It is quite possible that the debate will go on forever as to whether or not there are mysterious forces at play or if there are logical explanations for the disappearances.

Bermuda’s make up is diverse. Because of the slave trade (introduced in Bermuda in 1616) the population of the islands is about 55% black, about 34% white and 7% mixed (2000 census). The official language is English while Portuguese is also spoken. More than 50% of the population is protestant and 15% is Roman Catholic, making Christianity the primary religion.

Bermudan cuisine benefits from its diverse population and tropical location. Loquat jam, Rum Swizzle, Conch Chowder, Hoppin’ John and Glass Candy are just a few of the recipes that caught our eye. However, we chose a dish that we felt could be quite useful for any day of the week: Kedgeree.

Kedgeree probably originated in India from a dish known as khichri. Because of the British presence in Inida it is thought that khichri (kedgeree) was brought back to the British Isles and adapted for local taste and available food. The dish found its way to Bermuda and was adapted to suit island life. Kedgeree is a traditional British breakfast dish made from curried rice, smoked fish, and boiled eggs, parsley and lemon juice.

Kedgeree

Ingredients

1 -2 cup cooked flaked fish (we used smoked salmon)
4 cups cooked white rice, hot
4 -6 hard-boiled eggs, finely chopped or cut in half
salt, to taste
pepper, to taste
garlic, minced, to taste
chopped parsley, to taste
light cream, to taste
butter, to taste

Directions

1. Mix first 7 ingredients together thoroughly.
2. Add the cream and butter to taste and to achieve the moisture level you desire.
3. This dish can be served hot, directly after mixing the ingredients or it can be chilled and served cold, but if doing so omit the butter and add a little more cream.


Photography Data:
Featured Photographer
Martin Turzak
ApertureFNumber: f/8.0
Make: NIKON CORPORATION
Model: NIKON D80
ExposureTime: 1/4
FNumber: 8/1
ExposureProgram: 1
ISOSpeedRatings: 100
MaxApertureValue: 30/10
MeteringMode: 5
LightSource: 0
Flash: 31
FocalLength: 1050/10

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34 comments

  • March 23, 2012 at 5:05 pm //

    What a coincidence! I learned about Kedgeree yesterday at someone’s post, and I didn’t know about this dish, but now I’m more familiar after your post. :-) Your version looks very pretty! Love the half boiled egg in there!

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:31 pm //

      Hi Nami san! You did, wow, what perfect timing then! Thank you so much for commenting = )

  • March 23, 2012 at 5:05 pm //

    What a coincidence! I learned about Kedgeree yesterday at someone’s post, and I didn’t know about this dish, but now I’m more familiar after your post. :-) Your version looks very pretty! Love the half boiled egg in there!

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:31 pm //

      Hi Nami san! You did, wow, what perfect timing then! Thank you so much for commenting = )

  • March 23, 2012 at 5:06 pm //

    Rice, fish, eggs, it’s the perfect meal anytime of day! I really enjoy discovering different food cultures through your posts!

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:30 pm //

      That’s so true, it is perfect anytime of day = )

  • March 23, 2012 at 5:06 pm //

    Rice, fish, eggs, it’s the perfect meal anytime of day! I really enjoy discovering different food cultures through your posts!

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:30 pm //

      That’s so true, it is perfect anytime of day = )

  • March 23, 2012 at 5:26 pm //

    Wow, this looks really good. I’ve never been to Bermuda but I have a very good reason to visit now! :)

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:22 pm //

      Hi Maureen, Bermuda is such a fun place to go, there is a lot of “conk” everything, everywhere though, it’s beautiful.

  • March 23, 2012 at 5:26 pm //

    Wow, this looks really good. I’ve never been to Bermuda but I have a very good reason to visit now! :)

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:22 pm //

      Hi Maureen, Bermuda is such a fun place to go, there is a lot of “conk” everything, everywhere though, it’s beautiful.

  • March 23, 2012 at 7:08 pm //

    I love dishes with histories like this – it makes food so much more interesting. And I have always wanted to try Kedgeree and this one looks so delicious!

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:21 pm //

      Thank you Jamie, we are truly so happy you are enjoying our posts!

  • March 23, 2012 at 7:08 pm //

    I love dishes with histories like this – it makes food so much more interesting. And I have always wanted to try Kedgeree and this one looks so delicious!

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:21 pm //

      Thank you Jamie, we are truly so happy you are enjoying our posts!

  • March 23, 2012 at 8:54 pm //

    What a great recipe! And thanks for the history lesson :-)

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:21 pm //

      So happy you enjoyed it Katherine!!! Oh, and Congrats on your new book too!!!

  • March 23, 2012 at 8:54 pm //

    What a great recipe! And thanks for the history lesson :-)

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:21 pm //

      So happy you enjoyed it Katherine!!! Oh, and Congrats on your new book too!!!

  • March 24, 2012 at 1:31 am //

    Love this post! Hope I can visit Bermuda one day. :)♥

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:21 pm //

      Thank you Ann = )

  • March 24, 2012 at 1:31 am //

    Love this post! Hope I can visit Bermuda one day. :)♥

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:21 pm //

      Thank you Ann = )

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:20 pm //

      Oh Heather, truly? Thanks so much for the self-esteem booster “wink” Thank you for your kind words.

    • March 24, 2012 at 1:20 pm //

      Oh Heather, truly? Thanks so much for the self-esteem booster “wink” Thank you for your kind words.

  • March 25, 2012 at 11:54 am //

    I have slowly got my taste buds to enjoy smoked fish, it is a gorgeous way to enjoy fish. I love the idea of eating hard boiled eggs with smoked salmon, it sounds like a delicious combo! Thank you for sharing, Hugs, Terra

  • March 25, 2012 at 11:54 am //

    I have slowly got my taste buds to enjoy smoked fish, it is a gorgeous way to enjoy fish. I love the idea of eating hard boiled eggs with smoked salmon, it sounds like a delicious combo! Thank you for sharing, Hugs, Terra

  • March 26, 2012 at 3:40 am //

    Wow – this looks fantastic, and I’d never heard of this at all! Thanks for introducing me to something entirely new and entirely delicious :)

    • March 26, 2012 at 7:27 am //

      You are so welcome Kiri.

  • March 26, 2012 at 3:40 am //

    Wow – this looks fantastic, and I’d never heard of this at all! Thanks for introducing me to something entirely new and entirely delicious :)

    • March 26, 2012 at 7:27 am //

      You are so welcome Kiri.